aMember, out of all the others, is perhaps one of the oldest and most popular membership site platforms out there. It stands out with being an independent membership platform that works like WordPress in terms of functionality and styling. The most popular feature is the ability to schedule content. This encourages your members to stay subscribed for longer in order to access content that has yet to be released. Other features include integrated modules that let you integrate separate modules to extend your membership site beyond the normal functionality. And the extensive affiliate program is attractive enough for enough to start promoting your products to their friends and family.
aMember, out of all the others, is perhaps one of the oldest and most popular membership site platforms out there. It stands out with being an independent membership platform that works like WordPress in terms of functionality and styling. The most popular feature is the ability to schedule content. This encourages your members to stay subscribed for longer in order to access content that has yet to be released. Other features include integrated modules that let you integrate separate modules to extend your membership site beyond the normal functionality. And the extensive affiliate program is attractive enough for enough to start promoting your products to their friends and family.
Membership runs $29.95/month or $299/year. Interestingly, both plans have a 3-day trial. This trial is very short, however I think it is smart as it will help ward off some tire kickers. Long trials increase drop-off because people can forget all about it. A short trial of 3 days, coupled with a 3-day marketing sequence, would help increase the stick rate of the trial.

Checklists have been used in healthcare practice to ensure that clinical practice guidelines are followed. An example is the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist developed for the World Health Organization and found to have a large effect on improving patient safety[2] and subsequently found to have a nil effect in a cohort of hospitals in the Province of Ontario in Canada.[3] According to a meta-analysis after introduction of the checklist mortality dropped by 23% and all complications by 40%, higher-quality studies are required to make the meta-analysis more robust.[4] However, checklist use in healthcare has not always met with success and the transferability between settings has been questioned.[5] In the UK, a study on the implementation of a checklist for provision of medical care to elderly patients admitting to hospital found that the checklist highlighted limitations with frailty assessment in acute care and motivated teams to review routine practices, but that work is needed to understand whether and how checklists can be embedded in complex multidisciplinary care.[6]

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