In response, some people choose terribly cumbersome names. They find out that “Tshirt.com” is taken and then learn that “HockeyTshirt.com” is also taken. So they create an unworkable domain name like VeryCool-HockeyTshirt.com. Not only is it too long, it contains a hyphen, which should be avoided (some users forget to put them in, sending them to your competitor’s site.)
I think they could play up their blog and get more sales out of it. The blog is hidden under the “About” menu or down in the footer. When you go to the site, everything is about the membership and any free content on the blog is quite understated. It just shows there are many ways to go with a blog. If it were me, however, I would make “Blog” a main menu item and not buried in a dropdown.

Asking members to login to the member site allows you to tailor the user experience to each member. With user-specific access you have the ability to remember what content they’ve subscribed to, what content they’ve accessed, and possibly what content they’ve favorited or completed. You can also provide quizzes and lessons to truly personalize the experience. This controlled membership area provides a very customized experience that enhances the user’s interaction with the website and builds engagement.

Of course, you will ‘sell’ this offer with professional sales copy, some great headlines, and maybe even some bullet points. But the general idea here is to introduce yourself to this new cold traffic visitor, let them know what you are about, let them know that you can help them, and convince them that the first step to solving their problem is to opt-in to your free offer. 
Google Sheets beat Microsoft to the punch and introduced a Checkbox as one of the Data Validation options. You can go to Insert > Checkbox to quickly create one, and you can customize it by going to Data > Data Validation. I've updated most of the Google Sheets versions of my checklists to use that feature. I hope Excel gets smart and introduces a similar feature some day.
aMember, out of all the others, is perhaps one of the oldest and most popular membership site platforms out there. It stands out with being an independent membership platform that works like WordPress in terms of functionality and styling. The most popular feature is the ability to schedule content. This encourages your members to stay subscribed for longer in order to access content that has yet to be released. Other features include integrated modules that let you integrate separate modules to extend your membership site beyond the normal functionality. And the extensive affiliate program is attractive enough for enough to start promoting your products to their friends and family.

They have a public Courses page which showcases some of the major courses from their library right out in the open. It looks like each course shown has it’s own landing page and is available for sale separately. This is a similar strategy that I use here at Blog Marketing Academy where certain courses are available separately. Each one functions as a front-end offer, essentially, with the upgrade to full membership as an upsell. They’re then positioning the membership as the obvious money-saving option.
Bailey Richert is an award-winning business coach who helps individuals launch and grow profitable online enterprises as “infopreneurs”: respected experts in their fields creating value, generating income and realizing their ideal lifestyles by sharing their life experience, knowledge and passions with others through information products and services.
Consumer Trends – Just because something is popular domestically doesn’t mean it will be internationally. Are they behind in a trend –– or does it just not apply for that market? If you don’t already have sales in a region, do consumer testing and surveys before you ever launch. Know that most businesses that expand internationally already have sales in a particular region before they launch specifically in that country.
Now that you’ve created your site and have taken into account the feedback of your first set of members, it’s time to start promoting to a wider audience. We’ve published lots of useful content covering this topic, including some simple SEO strategies for membership sites, as well as a guide to creating a buzz around your program.  Then there’s social media marketing to consider, not to mention starting a blog to attract more of your target audience.
One of the beautiful things about owning an online membership site is that you can automate many of the regular tasks you need to perform to run and grow your site.  With the right tools you can create content, deliver content, market your site, and manage your members much faster and easier than if you did it manually. And a good place to start is this automation checklist, which shows you the best way to take advantage of today’s technology to grow your site!
Consumer Trends – Just because something is popular domestically doesn’t mean it will be internationally. Are they behind in a trend –– or does it just not apply for that market? If you don’t already have sales in a region, do consumer testing and surveys before you ever launch. Know that most businesses that expand internationally already have sales in a particular region before they launch specifically in that country.
Focusing on acquiring new members is a key part of creating and maintaining a successful membership site. But perhaps even more important is keeping existing members happy. For starters, it’s probably easier to keep a member than find a new one. Then there’s the invaluable word-of-mouth marketing happy members contribute, not to mention the damage to your reputation unhappy members can do.
In professional diving, checklists are used in the preparation of equipment for a dive, and to ensure that the diver and life support systems are fully prepared before they enter the water. To a lesser extent, checklists are used by a minority of recreational divers, and by a larger proportion of technical divers during pre-dive checks. Studies have shown checklists to be effective at reducing the number of errors and consequent incidents.
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