The site is using aMemeber Pro. What a blast from the past for me! The very first membership software I ever used was aMember. I guess they’re still around. But, I guess when it isn’t broken, don’t fix it. In fact, all around, this site looks a little old-school. The design is quite basic. Once again, a solid reminder that offer matters more than looks.

I always look for the blog. 🙂 On Guitar Tricks, it is pretty much buried down in the footer. What this shows me is that their entire site is pretty much designed to become part of the membership. Their blog goes under the “News” section of the membership. It is open to the public. I can see the point of this, though, because essentially the entire site is gated. Unless a person finds them on search, by the time a person finds the blog, they’re an email subscriber and have the free membership.
Building a loyal community isn’t just about installing a forum or starting a closed Facebook group and calling it a day. It’s about making your members feel like they’re a part of something bigger than themselves, making them feel like their part of an elite or inner circle, making them feel special and valued, and giving them a sense of belonging. And this checklist shows you how to do all of this and more!
The site is using aMemeber Pro. What a blast from the past for me! The very first membership software I ever used was aMember. I guess they’re still around. But, I guess when it isn’t broken, don’t fix it. In fact, all around, this site looks a little old-school. The design is quite basic. Once again, a solid reminder that offer matters more than looks.
Wild Apricot is a very popular membership site software option amongst non-profits, small yacht clubs, small business hubs, and other small-scale organizations that need a simple to use membership management platform that delivers on its promise. With Wild Apricot, you can create a website quickly and easily with our drag and drop website builder; make a mobile-friendly member application form on the web with payments and workflow; automate renewals and activate member self-service to update information; manage your member and contact records securely and enable members-only content and membership directories; and even have an online store to support your membership revenue. You can even integrate members-only content into existing WordPress sites!
The program runs $11.99/month, $28.75/quarter or $108/year. I’d be curious to see how many people take the quarterly option. I know in my own business, when I offered a quarterly it just didn’t work. Everybody went for the annual plan. Plus, an annual plan would increase lifetime customer value quite a bit. I don’t know the numbers internally, but I’d probably want to test getting rid of the quarterly option and see how it tests out.
WishList Member is known to have broken some barriers towards creating a membership site on the fly, rather than having to spend days, even weeks, at a time to build a site that fully resembles the end goal — to sell a course, to enable users view private content, to allow users to register towards premium features and more. Create any number of subscription models, give your premium members timely updates from one membership to the next only because they have been subscribers for a set number of times, and you can easily integrate WishList Member with your existing WordPress installation, something that many have already done so.

Checklists have been used in healthcare practice to ensure that clinical practice guidelines are followed. An example is the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist developed for the World Health Organization and found to have a large effect on improving patient safety[2] and subsequently found to have a nil effect in a cohort of hospitals in the Province of Ontario in Canada.[3] According to a meta-analysis after introduction of the checklist mortality dropped by 23% and all complications by 40%, higher-quality studies are required to make the meta-analysis more robust.[4] However, checklist use in healthcare has not always met with success and the transferability between settings has been questioned.[5] In the UK, a study on the implementation of a checklist for provision of medical care to elderly patients admitting to hospital found that the checklist highlighted limitations with frailty assessment in acute care and motivated teams to review routine practices, but that work is needed to understand whether and how checklists can be embedded in complex multidisciplinary care.[6]
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