You probably have a rough idea for the topic of your membership site—otherwise you probably wouldn’t be reading this guide to launching a new membership program. However, even if you have a great idea for your project, it’s wise to invest some time in validating that idea. After all, it would be a shame to put in all the work involved in launching a high-quality membership site only to discover there’s no market or audience for your project.

In response, some people choose terribly cumbersome names. They find out that “Tshirt.com” is taken and then learn that “HockeyTshirt.com” is also taken. So they create an unworkable domain name like VeryCool-HockeyTshirt.com. Not only is it too long, it contains a hyphen, which should be avoided (some users forget to put them in, sending them to your competitor’s site.)

Membership sites are not just for products, though. Many online communities and similar kinds of projects use membership features to isolate the kinds of people that are only in it for the thrill of it. Community forums might want to utilize membership features because that would keep a set of professionals within a tightly sealed circle that would require a monthly payment to be a part of, which in turn creates a kind of atmosphere where more high-quality discussions and content sharing is encouraged.


Excessive dependence of checklists may hinder performance when dealing with a time-critical situation, for example a medical emergency or an in-flight emergency. Checklists should not be used as a replacement for common sense. Intensive training including rote-learning of checklists can help integrate use of checklists with more adaptive and flexible problem solving techniques.[citation needed]
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