Michael Useem is director of the Center for Leadership and Change Management, and William and Jacalyn Egan professor of management, at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of The Leadership Moment, Investor Capitalism, and The Go Point, among other books. His articles have appeared in Fortune, Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere, and he has presented programs and seminars on leadership development at American Express, Citigroup, Coca-Cola, Goldman Sachs, Google, Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Military Academy, and many other companies and organizations. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter.
To illustrate just one of the principles, consider the last, placing common mission ahead of personal interest, especially when its seems least natural to do so. This precept is expressed in our oft-used phrases of "servant" or "selfless" leadership, and it is well captured in a U.S. Marine Corps dictum: "The officer eats last." In business, Jim Collins makes it one of his defining qualities for those who lead their companies "from good to great."
Recall that at the start of this article I mentioned how easy it was to start an online business? The other side of that coin is that every man and his dog is doing exactly that. Online consumers are jaded, and impatient. It is not easy to convince them to spend their dollars with your relatively unknown startup because there are millions of relatively unknown startups, and most of them are complete rubbish.
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