An online business, one that’s not based on services, will involve selling a product. One of the least used features for building a community around products that business owners ignore is creating a membership platform. Businesses can use it to promote new ideas, reach a community of users who would willingly test your ideas and products, and create a community of people who will willingly encourage others to use your products and your ideas for the betterment of their own.
Bailey Richert is an award-winning business coach who helps individuals launch and grow profitable online enterprises as “infopreneurs”: respected experts in their fields creating value, generating income and realizing their ideal lifestyles by sharing their life experience, knowledge and passions with others through information products and services.
One of the big things about Insider is how much teaser content there is. Being that they have the membership and the public site all integrated together, you constantly SEE what members are getting but you run into the paywall if you’re not a member. This is the kind of setup you can ONLY have if your blog and your membership site are one and the same.
Great post – thank you :) I’m in the process of building my first website-based online course using Optimize Press – steep learning curve but I’m up for the challenge! The only membership site I personally use is Brian Johnson’s philosopher’s notes. He is a stunning example of focus and achievement – his content production rate is crazy and he offers something for every type of learner plus lots of free stuff – truly inspiring :) You can have a nose here: http://bit.ly/1POj5Ag
Focusing on acquiring new members is a key part of creating and maintaining a successful membership site. But perhaps even more important is keeping existing members happy. For starters, it’s probably easier to keep a member than find a new one. Then there’s the invaluable word-of-mouth marketing happy members contribute, not to mention the damage to your reputation unhappy members can do.
Google Sheets beat Microsoft to the punch and introduced a Checkbox as one of the Data Validation options. You can go to Insert > Checkbox to quickly create one, and you can customize it by going to Data > Data Validation. I've updated most of the Google Sheets versions of my checklists to use that feature. I hope Excel gets smart and introduces a similar feature some day.
A checklist is a type of job aid used to reduce failure by compensating for potential limits of human memory and attention. It helps to ensure consistency and completeness in carrying out a task. A basic example is the "to do list". A more advanced checklist would be a schedule, which lays out tasks to be done according to time of day or other factors. A primary task in checklist is documentation of the task and auditing against the documentation.
×